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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 140 (some duplicates have been removed)
year with irene. we thought it was going to be such a big event for new york and it was a dud. it wasn't a big dud for vermont, new hampshire, new jersey, because of the flooding. but this is what we have to work through right now. this storm that looks like that, like just literally nothing, still a small category 1 hurricane, but can this morph literally into something that will have 80 to 90 mile per hour winds, put 20 inches of rain down, and cause millions of people to be without power for days and probably some for weeks. can it happen? yes. all the forecasts say that it will happen. but you know what, all the forecasts said that irene would be a worse storm than it was and it's not. everyone i'm talking to believes that this storm will be significantly more impact for new york, new jersey, maybe pennsylvania than irene was. >> it's going to be a tropical storm, right, by the time it gets up, by the time it actually hits the eastern seaboard? >> no, it will be a tropical storm briefly in here. here's the model guidance for you. the models are all right there. we put them into mot
. during irene it was 4.4. we expect to double what we had in irene. that's the problem. that's what kicked in yesterday and that's why the mandatory evacuation order was kicked in. the storm is deep in low pressure, and we expect the wind field to push this water up through long island sound and just to give you an example. you can see what's going on here in terms of how high water is. it's below the sea wall, but it's probably going to be about a good third of the way up this pole. that brings it all the way back into the battery and probably into lower parts of manhattan as well. parts of wall street will probably flood, so we anticipate this water to be much higher. the only difference in it could be the fact that it's going to come up gradually as opposed to quick like with the storm surge. not gradual in like 20 minutes but maybe over an hour or so we see that water coming up and coming up. we see the tunnels here shut down. the brooklyn tunnels now shout done, the holland tunnel is closing at 2:00 this afternoon. that's an order from the governor. when you see things like that occur
are in pretty bad trouble. >> reporter: last year, during tropical storm irene, the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. and now, sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many predicted, some people, like this family, who live in the evacuation zone, are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> we have diapers, we have water. you know, just hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines as the supermarket tonight. >> it really is a mad house. >> reporter: yeah. >> like, oh, my god. >> reporter: the streets are crackling not with panic but with with an upbeat, pre-apocalyptic vibe. >> i'm a new yorker. come on, what do you want to do? >> reporter: got to admire her spirit. one piece of breaking news from here in new york. we just learned that the stock market will be closed tomorrow. there were concerns if they tried to stay open, they might lose power during the course of the day. back to you. >> and a few people over your shoulder still getting into the subway. dan harri
learned from last year's hurricane irene. here's the local mayor. all right, well, we talked to the local mayor earlier and they are prepared under 24-hour operations here trying to keep the lines of communication open with residents here who chose not to evacuate as well as keeping up-to-date with everything going on in terms of emergency responses and any type of damage that may come because of hurricane sandy, don and chad. >> sandy, standby. we have chad myers here again. sandy, you can play along in this as well. so we have sandra, chad is in ocean city, maryland, 200 miles north of georgia. georgia is getting pelted at this point. how long before sandy starts to feel what he's feeling? >> there are arms on this storm. they are almost like you see a picture of the hurricane with spiral bands. that's what we have with the storm. let me walk over here to describe what you're going to look at for the next 36 hours. i want you to know when you see it what you're seeing. there's the center of the storm right there, don. wherever there's color, that's where it is storming. that's where it
here. also when you think back to what happened with irene, there was concern about flooding on the sound side here of the outer banks, so, you know, this area is prone to flooding. that's something that everyone's keeping a close eye on. also the winds out here are picking up. they've been right around ten to 25 miles per hour off and on. the rain off and on. but the situation out here will deteriorate as the day goes on. this area remains under a flash flood watch and a tropical storm warning. so people are taking stock of that. they're getting supplies. a lot of peel pl-- people planng to ride this storm out. we talked about some of the people who hadn't boarded up their windows. it turns out there's a mix of people there. are some people who have homes here who don't live here, so those homes have not been boarded up. some people who plan to ride the storm up. that's what we're seeing here. some who have left the area. because when you think back to what happened with irene, irene was more of a direct hit. people saw a lot of damage in this area. this time they're expecti
. for irene, i'll step out of the way. you can see irene, over 600,000 without power. of course, a lot of folks remember that. that was just a year ago with the derecho during one of our hottest times of the year and temperature over 100 degrees, we had a million people without power. that was the system that came in fast. and without of course, a lot of preparation. sandy, over 450,000 without power. so less of an impact in terms of power outages but a the downed trees throughout the area that had to be dealt with. such a large storm system that's having impact on the rest of the country. one that we will truly remember for quite a long time. 43 degrees is our current temperature with the south win at ten miles per hour. we're still feeling that moisture in the air. so as temperatures drop overnight, it will be a chilly start to the day tomorrow. in the 30s. 35, frederick. 38 in la plata. we'll have a lot more on sandy's aftermath coming up in a couple minutes. >> thanks. >>> the next big project when it comes to sandy is the clean-up. prince george's county bureau chief tracee wilkin
much for the water to come up over the walls. last year, for hurricane irene, these residents had to be evacuated. this time around, they're ready for the worst. east coast communities going on the offensive. building sand walls, securing property and stocking up on supplies, as the superstorm closes in. after being pounded last year by hurricane irene with its record storm surge and feet of flooding, new york residents are once again bracing for the worst. damage from irene topped $14 billion. and sandy could wreak even more havoc. >> i lost everything in my basement. i had up to ten feet of water in my house. this is a concern. >> reporter: governor cuomo has declared a state of emergency in preparation for sandy's impact. and mayor michael bloomberg warned new york city residents to brace themselves. >> high winds that could force certain bridges to be closed. >> reporter: last year, in advance of irene, mayor bloomberg made the unprecedented order to evacuate low-lying areas of the city and shut down the subway system. as sandy barrels north, the city's more than 7 million str
, than last year's hurricane irene. with winds near 80 miles an hour, right now hurricane sandy is moving north along the eastern seaboard, already impacting portions of florida and georgia. mary thompson is tracking preparations ahead of the big storm. >> it's already been dubbed frankenstorm over the halloween horror story at lowe's. the east coast of course bracing for a storm with potential to do billions in damage. the latest update from noaa says heavy rains and flooding is forecast in the mid-atlantic states but high winds could be felt from the carolinas all the way up through new england. corporate america's prepping to serve both customers and protect its employees in light of this storm. at lowe's, a 24-hour command center tracks the storm while it shipped generators, batteries, chainsaws and other items in high demand after the storm to northeast markets expected to be impacted by sandy. as for the power provider, citi noting four with big exposure to the mid-atlantic and pennsylvania areas where the heaviest rains and flooding are forecast. banks saying any earnings risks for
jersey area. many of the area has memories of irene on their minds. irene caused billions of dollars of damage. already people here are getting ready for what some are calling the perfect storm. one saw homeowner sandbagging his home yesterday. this is the calm before the storm which is why experts say it is time to get yourself a disaster preparation kit. make sure you have bottled water, batteries and plenty of food on hand in case the storm does the damage it is expected to do. we are live in belmar, new jersey robert moses, fox news. >>> robert, thank you so much. >>> the fiscal cliff is still too much off but the tax hikes and spending cuts already hampering our economy. diane mess is heis here. >> the fiscal cliff may not have hit left but it is already hampering growth in the u.s. economy wiping out nearly 1 million jobs so far this year. the report goes on to forecast if congress fails to avert the cliff 6 million jobs will be lost before 2014 sending the unemployment rate up to 12 percent. part of the problem is the anticipation of the cliff. we are looking at 100 billion au
's hurricane irene. >> you saw in irene, we didn't move a lot of people out of the seniors homes and hospitals and if necessary, we are prepared to do the same thing. >> reporter: hurricane sandy has already ripped through jamaica and cuba and now it is in the bahamas. heavy rain and strong winds damaging many homes, knocking down power lines and uprooting trees. the cuban government says more than 50,000 people evacuated before the storm made landfall. sandy also forcing officials to postpone terror-related hearings at guantanamo bay. although no deaths have been reported in could you be arc the storm did kill at least four people elsewhere in the caribbean. phil keating, fox news. >>> a prim county jury find a former fbi agent guilty on all charged for killing a tamer while driving drunk. ed a ray and johnson cashed into lawrence garner's vehicle killing him and seriously injuring his friend. >>> president obama fresh off a busy couple of days crisscrossing swing states is back at the white house today. the president is staying in town aat the present timing a national democratic committee m
irene. >> you saw in irene we didn't move a lot of people out of seniors homes and hospitals and if necessary, we're prepared to do the same thing. >> reporter: hurricane sandy has already ripped through jamaica and cuba and now it's in the bahamas. heavy rain and strong winds damaged many homes, knocking down power lines and upreceipting trees. the cuban government -- uprooting trees. the cuban government said more than 50,000 people evacuated before the storm made landfall. terror-related hearings are to be delayed at u.s. base in guantanamo bay. the storm did kill four people in the caribbean. for the rest of thursday and through friday the entire east coast of florida from key largo up to jacksonville will be feeling hurricane sandy, but only as a tropical storm, a lot f wind, waves and outer bands of rain and from there sandy marches north. in miami phil keating, fox news. >> stay with fox 5 throughout the next 90 minutes as we track hurricane sandy. you can also follow the storm's path on myfoxhurricane.com. the website features enhanced satellite imagery, interactive
nervous. >> you think it's going to be bad? >> i think so. >> i'm worried. we lucked out with irene, and i don't know. this may be worse. >> nbc's tom strong traung is l rehoboth beach, delaware. any residents left? >> they have about eight hours, the governor issues a mandatory evacuation area. everybody must be out by 8:00. look down the beach, have you several dozen people trying to get their last glimpse. right now, low tide. looks pretty impressive. come high tide, around 6:30, it wouldn't be a surprise if we didn't see water coming up to this fence here. all around rehoboth beach, a lot of businesses boarded up. people making runs to the grocery store, water short, bread is short. people did what they could in terms of preparation. they had about eight hours, around that time, this area will be shut down. cut off the bridges and roads into here it won't be a very pleasant place to stay if the electricity is going to go out. which is a likelihood. 2,000 utility workers and we're talking about the maryland/dc area, baltimore areas, and states of emergencies in those areas as well. a lo
, and the like. just to give you some perspective, last year, during irene, large sections of roads were washed away here in north carolina. power was knocked out to about half a million people, and seven people died. so, even -- and that was a low-end storm. i wouldn't really read in to much to the fact that this is a tropical storm or a low-end hurricane. either way the effects are going to be devastating and now is the time when people really do need to prepare, alex. >> i'm glad you're putting that reminder out there. it's absolutely true. just because it says tropical storm right now, don't let your guard down. julie martin, thanks for watching things for us from north carolina. we're going to check back in with dylan dreyer at the bottom of the hour for the very latest on the path of the storm. al roker will also be coming our way from delaware. >>> back to politics now. today republican presidential nominee mitt romney heads for florida to campaign with senator marco rubio. governor romney and vice presidential candidate paul ryan had a big rally in ohio, and today congressman ryan is on
deep. that water has now come up, and we're well above the levels that we were during hurricane irene. that was expected as the storm surge now comes in, and as i said the wind picks up, and it's going to get worse as the -- as the evening goes on. all of the bridges now in and out of manhattan closed. the east river and the hudson river as well as the verazzano bridge that connects brooklyn and staten island. manhattan literally is now an island. there is also now the concern that conedison the local utility has raise that had they may have to do preemptive power outages, if it looks like some of the low-lying areas are going to flood to protect the underground equipment. they would do power outages, so so much for the utility of having utilities and elect call wires under a ground. that can be an issue as well when storm surges rise. we'll be back with more as our special coverage goes on. guys, back to you. >> thank you so much, scott. that's why we have so many issues with the exchange. that's the neighborhood where the new york stock exchange is. back to the dramatic picture in m
through the potomac highlands. very dangerous storm situation here. it is expected to be worse than irene was. please, i'm going to beg our viewers, take this very seriously. >> all right, again, keep updating throughout the day and throughout the week, gwen. thank you very much. >>> well, also, virginia on the mind of many folks. flooding is expected in many parts there. we go to the phone to governor bob macdonald. thank you for joining us, governor. >> thanks, melanie. appreciate you having us on so we can talk to the viewers about getting ready for the storm. >> and so what are you bracing for in virginia right now? >> well, the biggest threats are the sustained, sustained combination of wind, rain that causes downed power lines. we're expecting sustained winds of 50, 60 mile-an-hour near the coast with 8 to 10 inches of rain. and you do that from sunday to wednesday and you're looking at downed trees and power outages. and that's our biggest concern. then follow that by cold as opposed to the heat we've had with other hurricanes. we just want to have people be prepared, take all the
's reliability problems have existed for years. the last two years with snowmageddon and&hurricane irene and the surprise derecchio storm, reconnection efforts were particularly slow pepco promised to spend more but given the utility's record, the state's public service commission in july allowed only a limited rate hike for the electric company a 130-page report from the governor's task force concluded that utility effort's are still falling short. >> an electric grid that served well and the storm events in the 1980s is not a grid reliable in the more violent and frequent storms that we have now. >> reporter: o'malley estimates that $1 to $2 a month per household will not only speed up the tree trimming -- >> maybe selective undergrounding and other engineering fixes that are different for every portion of the service area. >> reporter: to get the extra dollar or two a month, the utility would have to accelerate reliability strategies. what do ratepayers think? we found a mixed reaction in mont groomery county which, is hard hit the last few years. >> and we pay a lot of mean every mon
into new england so we don't have much to compare to. irene last year, then you can go back to hazel in the '50s, but most people don't remember that so this has a chance to be one for the record books. >> to underline it for people on the east coast, when will they feel impact? >> florida today and tomorrow but big impacts sunday north carolina, up through mid-atlantic, monday into tuesday morning. >> early in the week. thanks for keeping an eye on it. >>> let's turn to sports. game one of the world series between giants and tigers in san francisco. ra cy young winner justin verlander making the start on a lot of rest and he was rusty. pablo sandoval gets one over the center field wall. giant with a 1-0 lead on that solo shot. his big night just getting started. third inning, giant up 2-0. sandoval going the other way off verlander. two-run home run, sneaks over the wall. giants up big there. verlander allowed -- had allowed just two runs in his previous three starts this postseason. gave up five in just four innings last night. meanwhile, barry zito dealing, triking out danny wuert
is that we kind of had those same warnings for irene. i don't want people to go oh, they just say that all the time just to get our attention. but, no, there is potential for some dire stuff going on here. and we're talking about power down -- power lines down trees down, all kinds of other things. finally the computers are agreeing. and you can see a couple doing loops. if this thing does a loop right over new york or new jersey or pennsylvania, that means 24 to 36 hours of rain coming down an inch in an hour. do the math. that's a couple feet of potential water. here we go. the potential impacts, i think the coastal infland flooding the biggest. obviously we saw that in vermont from irene. the waves will be larger than 30 feet battering long island, new rhode island all the way to massachusetts and new jersey depending on where it lands. coastal erosion. we could lose homes as the beach gets washed away and power outages could be in the millions taking literally maybe a week to get all those power lines back up. and that could be far enough that it could affect the ele
island instead of bussing people off the island as they did last year during irene. and that's why we have a situation. let's walk over here and show you what the rest o of atlantic city is dealing with. this is an access ramp that takes you up to the boardwalk. so these are the streets of atlantic city down here. this is what it looks like. several feet of water covering the street. and here's where things became a problem. you have 400 people on the other side of the city who decided to ride out the storm and stay in their homes and as we talked earlier today, flood water was coming into those homes and there was no way for local emergency crews to get to them. so they had to mobilize national guard units to get those people out of their homes. things got so dangerous they had to pull the personnel back. so there were a couple hundred people still in their homes on the bay side of the city. the governor said it's a situation they will have to monitor and first thing in the morning at first light respond to and try to get those people out. not far from here just a couple blocks, one
experts predict considerable flooding in an area that has little elevation. last year, irene, and driving through the wall street area. now, last year, you and i were standing almost exactly here to get a very different situation. the surge isn't going to bring just water. it's going to bring force. and that's why we don't know how it will affect an area like this already in evacuation. people aren't living in the area where we are right now. if the forecasters, not you, sam, but everybody in general, close to accurate, this place is going to look very different tomorrow. maybe permanently. >> chris, we're standing right here where the water is up on the edge. last year where we were here, the water was two or fee below that. didn't really get to the top until the middle of the storm. >> absolutely. >> amy. >> chris, sam, thanks so much. we want to take a look at times square. because normally at this hour, it's crammed with traffic. well, look at that, it is a virtual ghost town. sandy has forced officials to shut down the subways for the second time in its history. josh is out on times
evacuations in the past 14 months. the problem is 14 months ago turn hurricane irene, that just perhapses, it does not do the damage everybody predicted. a lot of people that evacuated suffered more with the evacuation centers than those who stayed behind. everybody was worried that people would say, that's the lesson they learned, they're going to stay behind this time. we see a lot of people sticking around. couple of bars are open, they're having hurricane parties. everything isn't so bad right now, but the partyings going to be turning a lot of danger real soon if everybody sticks around tonight. there's no way in or out now. the main highways into this town are now shut down. and police are now using emergency vehicles, four wheel drives, they can't use police cars to get around. and a lot of these veteran officers are telling me if they drive around they're seeing streets flooded they've never seen, even big puddles on and this again, long before the worst of this stuff hits here in new jersey. tony, allison. >> steve, that is extraordinary. as you said, great concern because the wo
. but people are taking preparations. and perhaps because of this, victor. when irene came through, irene was more of a direct hit in this area. in fact, there's a coastal road that runs along here, highway 12, a good part of that was washed out. they're not expecting quite a direct hit with this particular storm, but again, they are talking about the wind, the rain and power outages. and victor, that's really what people are bracing for as the storm gets to us. >> i'm wondering, george, i saw an analyst yesterday saying this is going to be a lot worse than irene. are people sticking around for it, or are they boarding up and getting out of town? >> reporter: you know, when you walk around, when you take a look at how people are preparing for this storm, everyone's keeping a very close eye on us, as we report what's happening. they're watching the track of the storm system. right now it looks like it will move in a little further north than where we are. but we will feel the first brunt of the storm. we will see a lot of the winds that come through, the winds that could get up 40, 50 mile
irene making it the fourth costly experienced? >> this is will be worse. three storms. we've never seen anything like this. it's definitely going to be devastating. >> gregg: i was reading forbes, i wish we could put it on o up the scream. beside for potential life and safety, economists are predicting that it will upwards of $55 billion in economic damage? >> yeah, it's hard to tell. we don't really know how it'sng. estimates are all over the place. there is one positive. sectors that desperately need more work, construction workers, electricians, plumbers all the rest, they will be finding more work. so there is some stimulus there, but again it's mainly to the negative. >> gregg: if you are contractor out there, this maybe the silver lining. the other thing, we have seen in past disasters that it dramatically affects unemployment and g.d.p. because those are tied together? >> absolutely. people won't be going to work. as you said, retailers won't be selling, there won't be tax revenues. and g.d.p. measures how much we produce. if we are not producing that much, with that many people
wanted to give you a sense of what is going on here n. this area, irene came through here and called to minor flooding last year. people remember that and already since we have been out here, we have seen the tide start to rise and they can get higher, excuse me, on sunday because of a full moon and that can help the fuel -- to fuel sandy's fury. >> you mentioned folks already leary after experiencing irene. have you talked to people, are they planning to evacuate? are they planning to ride the storm out? what are their plans? >> a lot of people taking a wait-and-see approach and sandy is not expected to hit until sunday or tuesday and you have some people joking about it and others were taking it seriously. one lady was riding here by on a bike who said to man up, there is not going to be a major storm here. and another guy is stocking up on some party favors, not going to say what they are getting ready to have a party once sandy hits. >> we know people like to have fun but this is a serious situation out there. amari fleming, thank you very much for the update tonight. >> and, gar
in years. that sounds very dramatic, but it isn't so when you think about what irene did to connecticut last year. irene, many people in new york and new jersey rolled their eyes at it and said it wasn't a very big deal. here in connecticut it was a very big deal. here in fairfield there were houses with not just broken windows, houses knocked off foundation and thrown into the water. they expect this to be even worse, the storm surge to be even worse here than it was during irene. so that's the major concern. there's the mandatory evacuations up and down the connecticut coast. the good news is that most people are heeding those evacuation orders. the other big concern is power outages. all the wind they are expecting to get up here, because the wind is going to be very strong up on the northern edge of this storm. the wind will cause a lot of power outages along with that flooding. they expect -- connecticut light and power expect as many as 600,000 people to be without power here in connecticut for days on end. during irene they were without power for days on end as well so everybody
summer's hurricane irene cost more than $15.8 billion in damages after hitting an area from north carolina to maine. in 1972 hurricane agnes did more than $11.7 billion of damage. it went from florida to long island, new york. let's check in with bill karins. he is a upstairs. where is it now and where is it headed in the next few hours? >>> it's amazing it's safely off the shore. it's not causing too much damage or chaos yet. we'll watch landfall this evening probably around 8 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. that's when the destruction will be done during the high tide cycle and the winds. this morning is not horrible. here's the new forecast in the hurricane center. it increases in intensity. it could go up to 90 miles per hour. a healthy category one just off the "jersey shore." it will make the hook. the unusual historic cal hook to the left into the jersey shore. the winds will be in the center including from the central jersey shore. possibility of 80 mile per hour winds. we may be out there on the tip of long island, somewhere on the south shore be able to get a gust to 90. that's very,
to at the top-- top, it's the widest hurricane we've seen. hurricane irene came last august. she came knocking on the door and no one was listening. hurricane sandy is in the house and neither presidential candidate can walk away from what is happening. we've got to begin to plan for what's ahead. the reaction is that it's over. milk is spilt. the climate is changing rapidly. we've got a super storm that is right in front of us. we've got the hurricane coming in off the atlantic. it's met up with a nor'easter, and then to flow this thing into epic proportion, we're missing 1.35 million square miles of ice in the arctic. so all the heat in the arctic ocean is thrown up into the atmosphere and the jet stream, as it loops south as far south as well into this hurricane and we've got ourselves a super storm. hello. it's time to get into it. >> cenk: dr. halter, let me read you a quote from rutgers situation. she writes, the situation is consistent with what i would expect to see more often as a result of unabated warming especially the amplification of the warming in the arctic. you just mentioned
whether to shut down any public transportation as it did during irene. airlines are predicting cancellations and waiving change fees for passengers who want to reschedule. stay with 11 news for the latest on hurricane sandy, get updates on live wire and see how to prepare for power outages, on wbaltv.com and our mobile app. >> 5:09 and 59 degrees at b.w.i. hurricane sandy scrambles the final full week of campaigning for the presidential candidates. how both candidates are making the most of their time. >> cubans clean up after the destruction sandy left behind. >> tony has the latest on sandy in the insta-weather plus forecast next. stay with us. beep-bop-boop-bop boop-beep. [monotone] she says, "switch to progressive and you could save hundreds." call or click today. denny's everyday value slam egis four dollars every day. wait, is that right? eggs, bacon, pancakes. yeah. that's right. the four dollar everyday value slam. only four dollars every day. only at denny's. vo: for cold and flu season, honey, don't use your sleeve. there's clorox bleach. music: guitar, clapping and m
say it can be worse than irene. >> don't pay attention to it being downgraded. it doesn't mean anything. it's not really completely a tropical storm. it's going to be transitioning to what we kind of consider a nor'easter. we are accustomed to nor'easters. that kind of a event. moisture associated with a tropical storm. tropical storm holds a lot more water in the atmosphere as it transitions. that water is still going to be there radar picture showing the rain is following across parts of the carolinas. the rain is going to be heavy all day. battering waves, a lot of wind. beach erosion and that sort of thing here. go forward on the track of this storm. continues to move northeast. takes this unprecedented left-hand hook. that's where we've begin to go through a transition to a different type of a storm. people are used to hurricanes strengthening when there is warm water. this isn't going to be strengthening for those purpose purposes. snran way a nor'easter strengthens. european model track shows this. right around parts of jiewj. i want to point out other things on this map
be worse than irene, because this storm will hold its strength, back off as usual, and then feed into the winter storm. this is why it's unusual, because everybody is going to be watching it. it is going to look like it is going to go out to sea and then it looks like it will be pulled back towards the west. >> bill: irene was the one where there was so much flooding in the northeast. >> yes, this is going to be flooding rains very strong winds, and with the right angle for place like chesapeake bay, the south shores of long island and even into new york city if it comes in at the right angle. and it could be a worse-case scenario for some of those places. >> bill: i think maryland is probably drawn -- >> yes. >> i have a very important question, wednesday is halloween, and i have two kids at home that are going to freak out -- if they go out. what is going to happen on halloween. >> it will be a weakening storm, but still strong high pressure gusty winds, with the snow starts to fly higherel indications in parts of west virginia and parts of ohio and penn
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 140 (some duplicates have been removed)

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